The City in Mind

Unfortunately, didn’t write my thoughts down at the time of reading, so I’m logging on now to give you the scoop from the Library Journal:
“Cities are good. Suburbs are bad. Paris is good. Las Vegas is bad. Boston? Stay tuned. Kunstler, a vociferous, highly opinionated critic of the urban landscape, takes an uncompromisingly hard look at how eight cities (Paris, Atlanta, Mexico City, Berlin, Las Vegas, Rome, Boston, and London), either through inspired ideas or chaotic greed, became sublime expressions of the human spirit or of gigantic monstrosities and perversion. The subtitle is appropriate, for the author makes little attempt to be systematic or comprehensive in his discussions. Although he never raises the analysis above the level of a popular magazine article, his writing is admittedly bold and thought-provoking throughout. One can learn a great deal about Louis Napoleon’s renovation of Paris, Hitler’s and Albert Speer’s megalomaniac architectural plans for Berlin, Bugsy Segal’s “setting the tone” for Las Vegas, and more. The real charm of the book, however, is not Kunstler’s rambles through each city’s historical and geographical spaces but his plea for a more human-focused urban landscape.”
–Glenn Masuchika


auth=Kunstler, James
pub=2001
sub=Notes on the Urban Condition