Krakatoa

Superb, fantastic, excellent, thoroughly enjoyable! Winchester disappointed me slightly with his last book, The Map that Changed the World, but he has redeemed himself hugely with Krakatoa. As always, Winchester pays careful attention to the underpinnings of his story. Details range from the origination of plate tectonics (Alfred Wegener) and Winchester’s own Artic ash sample collecting to the unsung hero Alfred Russel Wallace coming up with the term ‘survial of the fittest’ and helping the procrastinator Charles Darwin find the missing pieces to his Origins of Species.
As one reviewer noted, Krakatoa lurks on the edges of most of the narrative, looming in the background as a constant presence. I actually read the whole book and several chapters delve deeply into the subject of Krakatoa and its explosion. The force from the August 27th, 1883 explosion caused two massive sea-waves (tsunamis) to overtake the surrounding coasts of Java and Sumatra, causing 35,000 casualties. Sound waves from the explosion travelled around the world seven times.
Krakatoa was the most explosive volcanic eruption in recorded time, and happened during a point in world history when news travelled fast (telegraph), so the global village was apprised of the eruption within days, if not hours of the event. So too, the dust/ash fallout of the explosion lingered in sunsets around the world for up to 3 years afterwards.
This book is a masterful production, with careful attention to evey pertinant detail. The construction and design of the book is equally delightful: the red lava of the hardcover not entirely covered by the 1/2 dustjacket with a depiction of Krakatoa from the September 1883 Harper’s Weekly. The drawings at the front of each chapter show Krakatoa in various stages, from dormant peaceful island with boats sailing by, to erupting fury, to a drawing of the missing island after it has blown itself up.
One of my favorite parts was the section on plate tectonics, detailing the creation of the Hawaiian Islands. Each island is a remnant of volcanic activity over the same hot spot, but the movement of the plate drifts each island away from the thermal vent, resulting in a chain of islands clearly depicting continental drift.


auth=Winchester, Simon
pub=2003
sub=The Day the World Exploded: August 27, 1883
isbn=0060838590