Alias Shakespeare

I’m convinced. Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford wrote the plays and sonnets we attribute to the name Shakespeare.
Oxford, 1550-1604, has several strong ties to the material within the plays and Sonnets. Oxford’s uncle, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey created the sonnet form we know as Shakespearian. Oxford studied law (Shksp uses legal language throughout the plays), travelled to Italy, was a favorite of Elizabeth I.
One arguments for Oxford is a disection of Oxford’s vocabulary (as survived in several letters and a preface to a book) compared to Shakespeare’s. They both use the same words, but when Bacon is compared to Shksp, the vocabulary circles are separate.
Shakespeare was a name Oxford came up with in order to publish his love poems to the Earl of Southampton. He continued to write plays and sonnets (the sonnets were not intended for publication, as they were personal love poems describing love between men), and after his death Shakespeare was reinvented by the Folio of 1623 which included all of his plays. They made no mention of the first two poems for which Skspr was famous, as an attempt to distance Shksp the homosexual poet from the playwrite. Oxford could have come in contact with a man named William Shakspear from Stratford, as Oxford was active in the theatre.
If you have doubts about the authorship of the plays, read this book. The appendix includes several detailed line by line comparisions of the plays versus Oxford’s letters and poems. Shakespeare is Dead! Long live de Vere!

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The Man Who Ate Everything

This book was a treat, full of elegant writing across a broad canvas of food, cooking, and eating. Composed of forty essays pulled from Steingarten’s regular column in /Vogue/, Steingaren’s prose is crisp and well-paced and never once let me down. While some topics were more interesting and develeoped than others, there is a constant curiosity and passion for capturing food and the ways we prepare and eat it.
Steingarten has a scientist’s eye for detail and immerses himself in thorough, sometimes fanciful, research and self-experimentation. He provides exacting accounts of regional cuisines (of France, Japan, North Africa, Memphis, and more), diet trends and food industry myths, and specific foods (from mashed potatoes to salt to ketchup) and food substitutes (olestra), as well a good number of recipes. Yet he always acknowledges his own tastes and sensations, keeping the essays moving with an energy and consistency that I did not think existed in 20th century magazine publishing. Nor did I realize that media coverage of the “French Paradox” originated with Steingarten in 1991.
Stand-outs include pieces on the Paris /Haut Bistros/, Kyoto cuisine, fruit and ripeness, /le regime Montignac/, and truffle hunting in rural Italy.
Also see Alexander Chancellor’s [New York Times review http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9907E4DA143AF934A35751C1A961958260] from December 7, 1997

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