Voyage to the End of the Room

Tibor begins to bore me; his writing is ok but after pages and pages I find myself skimming to get down to the meat of the story. Funny, that, since I don’t normally enjoy meat.
For this story, 4 distinct sections, London, Barcelona, Yugo & Chuuka. Oceane is a dancer turned graphic designer who doesn’t like leaving her flat in London. She monitors the mail as it hits the floor (or what she calls the beach), finding enjoyment in debt-collectors attempts to get tough on neighbors who moved out years earlier. One day, a letter from Walter arrives, who has been dead for 10 years. This launches a retrospective into how she met Walter, in Barcelona, working as a stripper.
Barca: hanging out on the roof top with the pool, several people started dying by drowning or being toppled by cows or helicopter crashes. Walter’s 10 year postmortem death aludes to the serial killer among them, pointing the finger at Rutger. Oceane never hangs out with Walter in Barca, but runs into him in London as she’s playing a game with a friend at a cafe for who will be approached by an aquaintance first. She wins. Oceane wanted to give Walter the reggae CD that he had been trying to find for years after hearing it in a taxi; she had owned the CD for a long time, but wanted to approach him alone. The opportunity never arose, and back to London she went.
Yugo (and I admit to skimming at this point): Yugoslavia, Oceane’s travel agent Audley volunteers for the Serb/Croat war, is accused of spying by his own side, and is saved when his mum arrives.
Chuuka: Walter’s final letter is in the hands of a chap named Bruno, in Chuuka in a far off land. Oceane hires Audley to go find the letter. While he’s there, he spots a statue of Rutgers. Bruno turns out to be a pyscho living on an aircraft carrier, and of no help in regards to the letter. Fortunately, Walter has also mailed a copy of the letter to Oceane, as insurance.
Some muddled stuff at the end about Audley being harrassed by Roberto, one of his Yugo captors. Ugh. Not recommended.

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