Walking Literary London

I took pieces of the walks suggested within; specifically the Bloomsbury and Soho and City walks. Was a good resource, not particularly great for a time-pressed visitor, but perhaps for a Londoner.
Highlights from my walks included actually getting to tour 44 Bedford Square (Lady Ottoline’s house where V. Woolf and H. James frequently visited) which is now a VAT tax office. Also Pepys Navy Office site, St. Dunstan’s ruins, the Temple, Virginia Woolf’s various houses about Bloomsbury, Thackaray/James in Kensington.

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Swimming to Antarctica

Awesome first person account of long distance swimming in sub 40s temperatures. Lynne details her swims, starting from the 3 hour swim through a hailstorm as a 9 year old, to her first attempt from Catalina to LA, crossing the English Channel with record breaking speed, 10 mile swims through the Nile with dead dogs, rats, and other disgusting surprises, Bering Strait swim that united USSR and USA, Lake Titicaca, Strait of Magellean, the list goes on and on. Her final swim was a mile swim to Antartica in 32 degree water.
Lynne is perfectly suited to long distance cold swimming, with an even distribution of body fat and a netrual buoyancy (she doesn’t have to work as hard to float).
This was a quick read, an inspirational story about setting goals and working your ass off to accomplish them.

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Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Another great quick read from JK! Most of the plot rumbled along flatly until the last hundred or so action packed pages. Romance in the air, Harry growing up and talking back to teachers and second guessing Dumbledore, the characters are definitely changing. Major character’s death, as promised. Can’t wait for book 7!

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Flow

Although it took me 10 months to meander through this book, this isn’t a reflection of the book’s interestingness or quality, but rather a reflection on my inability to focus. Every time I would pick this up to read a chapter over the last few months, waves of calm washed over me.
Main idea is that flow is good, harmonious, and is achieved by setting a goal that is high enough yet reachable, and expending enough energy to keep yourself occupied, and picking a goal that transcends self but complements the inner cares. And now onto another Csikszentmihalyi book: Good Business: Leadership, Flow, and the Making of Meaning.
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Basic premise that we filter our consciousness already b/c there are too many stimuli, so why not create a filter that makes us happy?
“How we feel about ourselves, the joy we get from living, ultimately depend directly on how the mind filters and interprets everyday experiences.”
Once you understand how to control your filter/experiences, you must do it consistently, constantly. An exercise to combat atrophy of control.
How to improve the quality of experience:
Attention. “We create ourselves by how we invest [our attention]. Memories, thoughts, and feelings are all shaped by how we use it. And it is an energy under our control, to do with as we please; hence, attention is our most important tool in the task of improving the quality of experience.”
The elements of enjoyment:
1. Confront tasks we have a chance of completing; a challenging activity that requires skills
2. Concentrate on what we are doing; the merging of action and awareness
3. Task has clear goals
4. Task provides immediate feedback
5. Act with a deep (but effortless) involvement that removes worries & frustrations of everyday life; concentration on the task at hand
6. Task allows you to exercise a sense of control over your actions
7. Task removes the concern for the self; loss of self-consciousness
8. Task alters sense of time; the transformation of time
Autotelic experience (from Greek: auto- self, telos- goal) is a self-contained activity done not for future benefit, but b/c doing it is the reward.
Conditions of flow: transform the self by making it more complex; line between boredom and anxiety; increase the challenge (which takes you closer to anxiety), but then you increase your skills (which takes you closer to boredom)

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A soldier of the great war

I hugely enjoyed Helprin’s collection of short stories (The Pacific), so am trying him on for longer stories. So far so good.
*****
Helprin is a yummy, aesthetically pleasing writer– these were great stories from the war (WWI), set in Italy and Austria/Hungary. Some very surreal moments, such as the Austrian field marshal who fakes all his battles to keep his troops safe, and takes Alessandro on as a private secretary after he finds Alessandro wandering delirious in the field eating roses. The cattle boat where everyone had to forget their squadron’s names, the confused general who confiscated Alessandro’s ham after he knocked on the hotel door (wrong hotel!), Orfeo and the sap, Rafi’s frozen body and rapelling down the glacier, Alessandro setting out to walk 2 days with the boy who missed the bus. Great stories, I will continue to read through his published work.

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