David Foster Wallace Interview

“… the sense I get of my generation of writers and intellectuals or whatever is that it’s 3:00 A.M. and the couch has several burn-holes and somebody’s thrown up in the umbrella stand and we’re wishing the revel would end.” Read the whole interview here.

Holiday Pleas from Book Lovers

All I want for Christmas is no more books foisted upon me by people whose taste in reading I don’t agree with. And Joe Queenan of the NYT also agrees with me in his Christmas article “Wish List: No More Books!” Reprinted here b/c of that nasty NYT habit of forcing archives behind walls. Best quote from the article: “Even if life were not too short, it would still be too short to read anything by Dan Aykroyd.”

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Freakonomics

Definitely as good and readable as all the hype surrounding it (unlike The World is Flat, which I found to be distastefully obvious). Topics as unlikely as abortion legalization in 1976 causing the decrease in crime in the mid 1900s; drug dealer infestation to figure out their sociology (most live with their moms b/c only the upper echelons of the gangs make serious cash); teachers and sumo wrestlers cheating b/c the incentives to succeed are too tempting; real estate agents listing their own houses for 10 more days than they’ll list yours b/c the incentive for their own house sale is much greater than yours.
Recommended.

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Endings

What are the options for authors finishing off and wrapping up their stories? Great Telegraph article on the ends of books, contrasted with the importance of beginings. Suggests that writers conceive of an ending when they begin writing, so they have a life raft they can swim towards as they write.

The Middle Mind

White has awoken my slumbering senses so far… I’m 65 pages in and feel more alive than before I began.
“… to make something that has the click of invention… is to feel that life has been pulled from the abyss called death of perception wherein one is dumbly pent by Stevens’ quotidian or Hegel’s ‘night,’ the night of the Middle Mind dead. Each day’s practice is the requirement of going once more to that abyss, where life’s failure is a real possibility, and plucking life out in the possibility (if not the realization) of its human capacity. This cannot be done in a context in which, as Stevens wrote, ‘the deer and the dachshund’ (or Eschenbach and Manilow) are one. It can be done only in a world in which the imagination rules supreme.”
*******
Later, finished the book. I love Curtis White’s crotchety, critical insights; he brutally rips apart contemporaries’ works without a care in the world. He demands that we THINK CHANGE. He demands that we delete our TVs. He begs us to read Wallace Stevens The Necessary Angel and trashes deconstructionism, and lambasts our politicians, and praises Marx Hegel and Chompsky. He likens Lycos CEO Bob Davis to Bizarro, Superman’s evil antithesis. He ridicules businessmen.
He urges us to give up Spielberg and embrace Radiohead.

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It Must’ve Been Something I Ate

After a couple of cross-country flights, finally finished this 500 pager. Steingarten writes well about food, tho’ nothing revolutionary. His endlessly deep pockets secures him $4k worth of caviar in a few months time, trips to and fro (France, Thailand, Baja California, New Orleans, Italy), and mounds of ingredients (pot a feu– roosters, pig’s blood, Turducken ingredients upwards of 90 spices). Probably the most inspiration I got out of this was the knowledge that he one day decided he had enough of being a lawyer and simply turned into the Vogue food editor.

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To the Power of Three

A half-step above beach reading, mildly interesting. High school girls involved in a triple shooting; Perri, Kat, Jodie the tight threesome since 3rd grade; Binnie & Eve the two farmgirls who don’t smell so good. The detectives. Peter Lasko the actor who lands a part in a Miramax movie but who ends up dead.
Probably the only redeeming feature was the mention of Television without Pity as something that could be on your computer screen when someone comes in to talk to you and you immediately minimize all windows before engaging in a conversation.
My advice: skip this one.

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