New Ideas From Dead Economists

Applying past economic theories to contemporary issues, Buchholz takes an entertaining tone and leaves us with a mildly interesting work. From my newbie’s perspective, there was too much information packed into 300 pages, so I’m left slightly confused still. Here’s what I currently remember:
Absent-minded Adam Smith (The Wealth of Nations, pub 1776) praised free trade and the division of labor- specializing and dividing tasks to explode production capacity.
Thomas Robert Malthus was primarily concerned about population growth and its effect on happiness.
David Ricardo favored free trade without tarrifs or restrictions. He saw 2 possible futures for Britain- protectionist island barring foreign goods, or an extroverted trader. The former would lead to a weakened economy. Free trade makes it possible for households to consume more goods regardless of whether trading partners are more or less economically advanced. “If French farmers are willing to feed us for less than it would cost us to feed ourselves, let us eat French food and spend our time doing something else.”
John Stuart Mill- tumultuous life, went from rationalist to romanticist. Wrote Principles of Politcal Economy in 1848. From this we get the non-flat income tax (2 tiered) which encourages work and income, and high estate tax, which also encourages work.
Karl Marx- capitalism is a necessary precondition for socialism. Alfred Marshall & the marginalists- elasticity of economy. Thorstein Veblen (Theory of the Leisure Class). Maynard Keynes- smarty pants Cambridge man- savings exacerbate recession.


auth=Buchholz, Todd G.
pub=1999
sub=An Introduction to Modern Economic Thought