Wasted

Truly touching story of a manic girl who develops eating disorders at age nine, deciding to troop downstairs and puke up her Fritos out of the blue. Thus begins her cycle of bulimia, where she can pretend to eat normally and secretly go and purge, which eventually morphs into anorexia, where she withers away to 53 pounds in front of everyone, garnering stares while she just wants to disappear, literally.
Hornbacher’s eating disorders crank into overdrive once she leaves the protective shell of her parents’ home in Minnesota to go to high school elsewhere, among other talented people some of whom are obsessed with weight. Returning home for the summer, her parents check her into a hospital where she’s force-fed and comes out more messed up than ever. In and out of treatment facilities for the next few years, she reaches rock bottom when health insurance taps out, and is put in a loony bin. Supposedly this is her turning point, and she begins college (without finishing high school) and working as a journalist.
Suddenly, she’s accepted to American University in DC, and goes at such a frenetic pace that she justifies her weight loss due to busyness. This is when she drops into the freakishly small range of under 60 pounds.
How does she bounce back? I’m not sure if I skimmed over this part, but she ends the book happily married, with disorder under control (although constantly asking her hubby if she has gained weight, ugh), and trying to develop a healthy relationship with food again.


auth=Hornbacher, Marya
pub=1998
sub=A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia
isbn=0060858796