The One Straw Revolution

Fukuoka was a scientist, working in a laboratory in Japan when he became sick, then depressed, and ultimately walked out on his safe life and headed for his father’s farm to try and let “do nothing” farming take its course. The idea that you can simply let nature work its course, not do terribly much in terms of plowing, weeding, fertilizing, etc, was and is revolutionary. Instead of chemically treating his crops, he allows natural predators to fight off insects that kill the plants. Instead of flooding his rice plains, he lets them sit for a week in water before draining the fields and letting the plants sprout naturally. With a cover crop of clover and barley, he restores nutrients while still growing other crops among the weeds.
His philosophy is about questioning why we do certain things, trying to get farmers to spend less time working and more time writing haikus.


auth=Fukuoka, Masanobu
pub=1977
sub=An Introduction to Natural Farming