Ripley Under Water

The last of the Ripleys, believe it or not. Highsmith kicks it into high gear with the ludicrous close calls that Ripley endures without being caught. This time, it’s a meddlesome rich American (David Pritchard) who arrives in the small French town to torment Tom by prank calling as Dickie Greenleaf and insinuating all sorts of crimes were committed by Tom (rightfully so). Creepily following Tom and his wife to Morocco, Pritchard endures a beat down from Tom and returns to their small village to begin sweeping the local rivers and dredging the waterways for any sign of the missing businessman who was going to expose Ripley’s art fraud in book 2. Hilariously, he finds the skeleton! And then deposits it on Ripley’s doorstep! But then Ripley removes the ring and throws it back into Pritchard’s pond, causing Pritchard and his wife to slip in and drown while trying to retrieve it. I think Tom calls it his easiest murders yet, which weren’t really murders, just not assisting the drowning figures. All of it is highly unlikely, and he gets off Scot free in the end, per usual.

Now that I’ve overdosed on Ripley, I have a few thoughts. Highsmith has an impeccable touch conveying the banality of evil. Throughout the series, Tom is more bothered by his perception of the screams of live lobsters being boiled to death by his housekeeper than by the many murders he accomplishes. You hang on every detail of domestic life, every mundane mention of a cocktail pour, a cigarette lit, because you’re never quite sure when the hammer blow of an unexpected Ripley-violence will occur. His propensity for confessing murder to his friends is unparalleled, yet does not get him busted. It’s mesmerizing, and some of the best crime/mystery I’ve read in awhile. On to headier and more substantial reads!