The Price of Loyalty

Scary inside look into the Bush administration. Scripted cabinet meetings where everyone knew their lines and people were cued to talk. Paul O’Neil a wise voice in the circle, thus excluded when he didnt’ toe the line. His openness about importance of water to Africa what got him outed? President Cheney manipulating people at every turn, from behind a screen (literally, during Cabinet meetings). Powell & Condi intelligent voices confused by the lack of direction in the administration. Paul went from being nicknamed “Pablo” to “the big O” by Dubya. Recommended.

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What Clients Love

I’m naturally suspicious of any book that pertains to business development. But there is some good advice among this book’s pages- specifically the importance of having the right person as a receptionist, as your clients’ first impression when they visit the office is of 1)the decor & 2)the friendliness (or lack thereof) of the receptionist. Simply welcoming people does a lot to creating a good relationship. Some obvious stuff about listening, and implying that the client matters to you. Following up with a personal note, not simply sending all clients the same holiday gift, cutting down on response time, finding a name that makes sense and is memorable.

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The Great Gatsby

Bleh. Why does everyone get all excited about Gatsby? It was average at best. Not sure why this is deemed a classic even. Maybe I harbor a grudge b/c of the whole Zelda thing (F. Scott stealing her journal, etc.).
Gatsby a self-made man, in love with Daisy, who’s married to Tom. Tom having an affair with Wilson’s wife, who is killed by Daisy in yellow car on way back from the city. Wilson kills Gatsby, then self. Nick, Daisy’s cousin, the narrator for the story. Lives next door to Gatsby in West Egg.

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The Dark Fields

Beginning quote was from The Great Gatsby, which was a bit freaky b/c I’m currently reading that as well.
Well written & great plot- discovery of a “smart drug” changes Eddie Spinola’s life. He goes from toiling as a copywriter with writer’s block to being an integral part of the largest corporate merger/acquisition in history. The drug (MDT-48) enables him to read & understand at an increased rate. He learns Italian in a night, teaches himself complex financial formulas, becomes a successful day-trader who makes $250k in 2 days after borrowing $100k from a Russian mobster named Gennady. Naturally, Eddie’s upping his dosage to continue climbing the heights of the financial world. When Gennady comes by for his first payment on the loan, he steals 5 of the pills that are sittting in a ceramic bowl on a shelf in Eddie’s apartment. Gennady becomes hooked and begins bullying Eddie to put him in contact with his dealer. Meanwhile, Eddie is working on the merger of an ISP and a media company (AOL Time Warner, anyone?). And he begins having extensive periods of blackout, not sure where he’s been and what he’s been doing, just clicking ahead and finding himself mid-sentence eating dinner with a group of strangers. After one of these nights he finds walking to Brooklyn, unsure why. This was the night he killed a woman in a hotel room, punched a guy in a bar, and had sex in a club bathroom. Thus his world begins to unravel. If he stops taking the MDT, extreme headaches ensue.
Why am I telling you all this? Go read it!

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Voyage to the End of the Room

Tibor begins to bore me; his writing is ok but after pages and pages I find myself skimming to get down to the meat of the story. Funny, that, since I don’t normally enjoy meat.
For this story, 4 distinct sections, London, Barcelona, Yugo & Chuuka. Oceane is a dancer turned graphic designer who doesn’t like leaving her flat in London. She monitors the mail as it hits the floor (or what she calls the beach), finding enjoyment in debt-collectors attempts to get tough on neighbors who moved out years earlier. One day, a letter from Walter arrives, who has been dead for 10 years. This launches a retrospective into how she met Walter, in Barcelona, working as a stripper.
Barca: hanging out on the roof top with the pool, several people started dying by drowning or being toppled by cows or helicopter crashes. Walter’s 10 year postmortem death aludes to the serial killer among them, pointing the finger at Rutger. Oceane never hangs out with Walter in Barca, but runs into him in London as she’s playing a game with a friend at a cafe for who will be approached by an aquaintance first. She wins. Oceane wanted to give Walter the reggae CD that he had been trying to find for years after hearing it in a taxi; she had owned the CD for a long time, but wanted to approach him alone. The opportunity never arose, and back to London she went.
Yugo (and I admit to skimming at this point): Yugoslavia, Oceane’s travel agent Audley volunteers for the Serb/Croat war, is accused of spying by his own side, and is saved when his mum arrives.
Chuuka: Walter’s final letter is in the hands of a chap named Bruno, in Chuuka in a far off land. Oceane hires Audley to go find the letter. While he’s there, he spots a statue of Rutgers. Bruno turns out to be a pyscho living on an aircraft carrier, and of no help in regards to the letter. Fortunately, Walter has also mailed a copy of the letter to Oceane, as insurance.
Some muddled stuff at the end about Audley being harrassed by Roberto, one of his Yugo captors. Ugh. Not recommended.

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